Report: FBI Labeled Antifa Domestic Terrorism Long Before Charlottesville

ANTIFA, Terrorism

Politico reports that the Obama Administration “formally classified” Antifa’s activities as “domestic terrorist violence” as early as April 2016, which is long before Charlottesville, and before President Trump was criticized for blaming both sides.

Federal authorities have been warning state and local officials since early 2016 that leftist extremists known as “antifa” had become increasingly confrontational and dangerous, so much so that the Department of Homeland Security formally classified their activities as “domestic terrorist violence,” according to interviews and confidential law enforcement documents obtained by POLITICO.

Since well before the Aug. 12 rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, turned deadly, DHS has been issuing warnings about the growing likelihood of lethal violence between the left-wing anarchists and right-wing white supremacist and nationalist groups.

Previously unreported documents disclose that by April 2016, authorities believed that “anarchist extremists” were the primary instigators of violence at public rallies against a range of targets. They were blamed by authorities for attacks on the police, government and political institutions, along with symbols of “the capitalist system,” racism, social injustice and fascism, according to a confidential 2016 joint intelligence assessment by DHS and the FBI.

Read the full story at Politico.

Author: Sander Laanemaa

Sander Laanemaa was born in Estonia in 1984. In 2011 he graduated from the Estonian Maritime Academy as a deck officer. During his studies he took an interest in history, philosophy, psychology, and the occult. His research guided him deep into the rabbit hole, which ultimately led to the creation of Culture Wars.

Sander is fluent in English, Swedish, Finnish, and Estonian.

He has given a number of lectures on various topics on maritime affairs, and also on ancient history and the faults of contemporary social movements.

Leave a Reply